Land surveyor

Alternative titles for this job include GIS surveyor, geomatics surveyor

Land surveyors measure the shape of the land, and gather data for civil engineering and construction projects.

Average salary (a year)

£20,000 Starter

to

£70,000 Experienced

Typical hours (a week)

38 to 40 a week

You could work

evenings / weekends away from home

How to become a Land surveyor

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course
  • an apprenticeship
  • a graduate training scheme

University

You'll usually need a relevant degree or postgraduate qualification, accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

Relevant subjects include:

  • surveying
  • civil engineering
  • geomatics
  • geographical information science

You may be able to do a postgraduate conversion course if your first degree is not related to surveying.

Entry requirements

You'll usually need:

  • 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, including English and maths
  • 2 to 3 A levels for a degree
  • a degree in any subject for a postgraduate course

More information

Apprenticeship

You could do a geospatial and mapping science degree apprenticeship.

Entry requirements

Employers will set their own entry requirements.

  • GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) and college qualifications like A levels for a degree apprenticeship

More information

Other routes

You could get a postgraduate qualification through a graduate trainee scheme.

You could also get a graduate diploma in surveying by distance learning, with the University College of Estate Management, if you're working for a surveying practice.

More information

Registration

Professional and industry bodies

You can join the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors for professional recognition, training opportunities and to make industry contacts.

Further information

You can find out more about becoming a land surveyor from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and The Survey Association.

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You'll need:

  • maths knowledge
  • knowledge of engineering science and technology
  • knowledge of geography
  • analytical thinking skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • the ability to use your initiative
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • thinking and reasoning skills
  • You will be expected to use a computer confidently as part of this job.

What you'll do

Day-to-day tasks

You'll collect and analyse data to map the land for civil engineering and construction projects. This will include:

  • carrying out surveys and checking possible effects on the environment
  • producing a map of the land, using GPS and surveying instruments
  • using digital images and satellite photos to create maps
  • collecting data and using geographic information systems (GIS) to analyse it
  • monitoring whether the land has moved during construction or by natural processes
  • drawing charts and maps using computer aided design (CAD)

 

Working environment

You could work in an office or on a construction site.

You may need to wear safety clothing.

Career path and progression

With experience, you could move into project management or contract management. You could specialise in an aspect of surveying, or work as a self-employed consultant.

Applying for chartered status through RICS could improve your career prospects.

Training opportunities

Apprenticeships In England

We can't find any apprenticeship vacancies in England for a Land surveyor right now.

The Find an apprenticeship service can help you with your search, send alerts when new apprenticeships become available and has advice on how to apply.

Courses In England

CG DIPLOMA IN CONSTRUCTION SKILLS - LEVEL 1

  • Provider: EXETER COLLEGE
  • Start date: 10 September 2019
  • Location: EXETER

Edexcel Extended Diploma in Construction

  • Provider: OAKLANDS COLLEGE
  • Start date: 07 January 2019
  • Location: Welwyn Garden City

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