Audiologist

Audiologists work with children and adults who suffer from hearing loss, tinnitus, or have problems with balance.

Average salary (a year)

£22,000 Starter

to

£41,500 Experienced

Typical hours (a week)

38 to 40 a week

You could work

between 8am and 6pm

How to become an Audiologist

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course

University

You'll need to complete a 3-year NHS Practitioner Training Programme in healthcare science (audiology).

To work as an audiologist in the private sector, you'll need to do an audiology degree approved by the Health and Care Professions Council.

You could join the postgraduate NHS Scientist Training Programme, if you already have a science degree. This is a 3-year course in clinical science, specialising in neurosensory sciences.

Entry requirements

You'll usually need:

  • 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (C) or above, including English, maths and sometimes a science
  • 2 or 3 A levels, including a science
  • a degree in a relevant subject for postgraduate study

More information

Volunteering and experience

You'll find it helpful to get some paid or voluntary experience in a healthcare setting before you apply for a course.

You could contact the voluntary services co-ordinator at your local NHS trust for further advice.

More information

Registration

Professional and industry bodies

You could register with The Registration Council for Clinical Physiologists to get access to professional development and networking opportunities.

Further information

You can find out more about becoming an audiologist from:

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You'll need:

  • customer service skills
  • sensitivity and understanding
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • thinking and reasoning skills
  • knowledge of English language
  • the ability to read English
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • knowledge of psychology
  • Being able to use a computer terminal or hand-held device may be beneficial for this job.

Restrictions and requirements

You'll need to:

What you'll do

Day-to-day tasks

Your day-to-day duties might include:

  • deciding on the best way to test a patient’s hearing
  • adapting tests to suit the age and ability of the patient
  • checking hearing, including sound level and frequency range
  • investigating any related medical, physical and emotional symptoms

Working environment

You could work in an NHS or private hospital.

You may need to wear a uniform.

Career path and progression

You could go on to specialise in areas like balance rehabilitation, cochlear implants, or assisting people with learning disabilities or dual sensory loss.

With experience, you could lead a team, manage a unit, or move into a general management position in mainstream healthcare.

You could also take on a research or teaching post at a university. 

Training opportunities

Apprenticeships In England

We can't find any apprenticeship vacancies in England for an Audiologist right now.

The Find an apprenticeship service can help you with your search, send alerts when new apprenticeships become available and has advice on how to apply.

Courses In England

NOCN Certificate in Progression to Further Studies in Health Science L2 - Pre Access to Health Science

  • Provider: Bishop Auckland College
  • Start date: 01 September 2019
  • Location: Bishop Auckland

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