Botanist

Alternative titles for this job include Plant biologist

Botanists study all forms of plant life.

Average salary (a year)

£22,000 Starter

to

£55,000 Experienced

Typical hours (a week)

38 to 40 variable

You could work

evenings / weekends / bank holidays away from home

How to become a Botanist

You can get into this job through:

  • a university course

University

You'll usually need a degree in a subject like:

  • botany
  • ecology
  • environmental science
  • plant biology
  • plant science

You'll also need a postgraduate qualification, like a master's degree or PhD, for teaching or research posts.

Entry requirements

You'll usually need:

  • 2 or 3 A levels, including a biological science for a degree
  • a degree in a relevant subject for postgraduate study

More information

Volunteering and experience

It may be helpful if you volunteer with a relevant organisation, like the the Royal Horticultural Society and the Field Studies Council, before you apply for your first job.

More information

Further information

You can find out more about plant biology through the Royal Society of Biology.

What it takes

Skills and knowledge

You'll need:

  • knowledge of biology
  • maths knowledge
  • complex problem-solving skills
  • knowledge of teaching and the ability to design courses
  • excellent verbal communication skills
  • to be thorough and pay attention to detail
  • analytical thinking skills
  • ambition and a desire to succeed
  • You will be expected to use a computer confidently as part of this job.

What you'll do

Day-to-day tasks

You could specialise in:

  • the study of specific plant groups
  • plant anatomy and physiology
  • biochemistry
  • molecular biology
  • genetics
  • ecology
  • marine botany
  • paleobotany - the study of fossilised plant remains
  • taxonomy - the identification and classification of plants

Your work will vary depending on your role, but could include:

  • identifying, classifying, recording and monitoring plant species and biodiversity
  • ecological consultancy work, including surveys and environmental impact assessments
  • managing a botanical collection
  • searching for new species
  • studying the effects of pollution on plant life
  • identifying and purifying chemicals produced by plants for use in products like drugs, food, fabrics, solvents and building materials
  • presenting research results in journals, books and at academic conferences
  • training and supervising junior staff and volunteers
  • teaching at a university

Working environment

You could work at a university, at a research facility or in a laboratory.

Your working environment may be outdoors some of the time and you'll travel often.

Career path and progression

With experience in industry, you could move into a more senior position. In field research and conservation, you’ll usually need to take on organisational, management or advisory responsibilities in order to progress. 

You could move into plant science, investigating biodiversity, crop production and plant diseases.
 
You could also become a freelance consultant.

Training opportunities

Apprenticeships In England

We can't find any apprenticeship vacancies in England for a Botanist right now.

The Find an apprenticeship service can help you with your search, send alerts when new apprenticeships become available and has advice on how to apply.

Courses In England

Construction Civil Engineering: Plant Operations

  • Provider: Greater Manchester Construction Training Ltd
  • Start date: 04 March 2019
  • Location: Rochdale

RHS Level 2 Certificate in the Principles of Plant Growth Propagation and Development (day)

  • Provider: Writtle University College
  • Start date: 02 September 2019
  • Location: Chelmsford

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